Archive for June, 2009

I had the pleasure of hosting a twebinar this week with Jason Falls of Doe-Anderson titled “Social Media: Your Agency Doesn’t Get It… Who Does?”  I met Jason briefly for the first time this year at SXSW but only had a few minutes to connect with him in the blogger lounge before we both ran off to sessions.  I have followed him on his blog and Twitter for a lot longer and am a big fan.

I was particularly excited about this session because the content the content is compelling and Jason is an expert on the subject having worked both with and for a host of marketing agencies.  There are not many people with experience on both sides of the fence and I was anxious to hear his thoughts.  Below are links to the slides, video recording and podcast of the session but before you view anything, here are my top 10 favorite quotes/learning’s from the session with Jason:

  1. Martell Home Builders – A great social media case study: Local contractors have their project managers update project status on Twitter so customers can see where they are, how the project is going and provide a way to contact them.  An excellent example of using the social web to improve customer service. What a great use of Twitter!
  2. Note to “Classically Trained” marketers: Social Media is the antithesis of advertising. Dialogue is lost on classically trained marketers and it’s difficult to teach classically trained marketers the new way of doing things.
  3. On Interactive Marketing at large agencies: Interactive is an add-on most of the time. Many think interactive, but struggle with integration.
  4. Agency outsourcing: Most agencies will say they can do anything, and then go find a partner who can help them pull it off.  If transparency and honesty are the most important thing in social media, agencies need to up front with clients when outsourcing services.
  5. Questions to ask social media agencies: What is the strategy behind your recommendations?  What social media mistakes have you made and what did you learn from them? Do they have blogs? Are your employees on twitter? Can you share case studies? Who does strategy, who does execution?
  6. Note to self: Marketing “people” need to understand math :-)
  7. On B2B vs B2C: There is no B2B or B2C, it’s all about P2P: People to People.
  8. Biggest challenge brands face: There are conversations happening everywhere and most brands don’t have the right people to manage social media.
  9. About Twitter: Twitter is not a platform for marketing, however it can be used for it.  It’s a platform for conversation.
  10. On ROI: ROI is easy to measure in social media, if your social media programs are aligned with clear business goals.

Slides:

View more documents from Mike Lewis.

Recording:

Podcast:
Social Media Marketing: My Agency Doesn’t Get It… Who Does?”

I have only known C.C. Chapman for a couple of years.   We first met when we were both speakers at the New Marketing Summit (now the Inbound Marketing Summit).  Actually, I think our first “in person” meeting was just before I  interviewed him for New Marketing T.V. What’s really interesting is that while we both graduated from Bentley University (granted it was at different times – C.C. is WAY older than me ;-)) and shared several friends (shout out to @bostonsarah), we first connected through social media. You see, the first time we actually “spoke” was months before we met in person when we began chatting on Twitter and Facebook.  C.C. said it best during the session “I guess this social networking thing really works.”  Since our first meeting at NMS I have seen him speak 5 or 6 times and I always learn something new from him. It was great connecting with him last week and I hope you get some great insight from the interview below (slides, recording and a podcast of the Q&A session are included in this post):

Slides from Building Participation in Your Community: Passion is Contagious:

Recording of Building Participation in Your Community: Passion is Contagious:

Podcast (Audio Only):
Passion is Contagious: An Interview with C.C. Chapman